Friday, March 31st, 2017

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“Sold in 36 Hours” by Nate Big (An Honest Review)

Soldin 36 Hours? For real?Hi, guys.

You may have heard Nathan Big is releasing a new piece of education onto the real estate investing landscape. It’s called “Sold in 36 Hours” and claims to be “a systemized blueprint for how to sell a house over the course of a weekend…”

… basically promising to help you sell your houses quickly, to A-credit, cash-out buyers that can get financed in this market and close in 30 days. Big promise, I know.

Nate in fact calls himself,

The exit strategy guy…a master at marketing and selling houses in a down market.

…and frankly he’s got over 200 successful “Sold in 36 Hours” style deals notched in his belt to back it up.

An Honest Review and a Candid Interview…

Since first mentioning Nate’s coming offering a couple of weeks ago, a number of folks have expressed interest in Nate’s material (especially timely in today’s squirrelly buyer’s market) and asked for more info.  So I asked Nate to send me a preview copy of his home study materials and he was kind enough to oblige.

After reviewing the material, I’ve recorded my honest review/assessment in this short video. If you’re considering investing in Nate’s material, you might want to watch this first…

In this video you’ll find out:

  • What is this really? (and what it’s not)
  • Pluses and Minuses IMHO
  • What makes it unique
  • Who it’s ideally suited for
  • A frank, final assessment

Also you may recall I recently had the chance to interview Nate for a few minutes about this.  We had a frank, unscripted chat which, in my opinion, offers an exceptional look past the marketing and into the essence of what this is really all about.

This was a solid interview, so I’m republishing the entire thing here as well.  I think you’ll also find it an insightful aid in your due diligence process…

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Interested in Nate’s “Sold in 36 Hours” Method?  Get More Info Here…

Thanks for watching/listening.  And as always, your comments are welcome.

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About 

JP Moses is a roughly-hewn man-child who first got into REI after reading Rich Dad, Poor Dad back in Y2K and went full time in 2002. He's tinkered in everything from landlording to short sales to rehabs to Realtoring to REOs to notes to owner financing, blah, blah, blah...Till he finally stuck his flag deep into wholesaling and has since flipped somewhere north of a couple hundred deals.

JP's not a “guru” but also doesn't think it's a bad word. Among his core values are authenticity, creativity, big honkin' value, general fun-ness and being unshaven. He's super proud to be chief blogger guy at REItips.com and host of the free REIology podcast. He also thoroughly enjoys sharing his 53 best real estate investing forms with anyone who wants them. You should totally check that out. :-)

  • Is this basically a round robin auction course ?

    In the big picture, yes. But it’s tailored for the real estate investor and for today’s market. Frankly, having reviewed it, I think just having the step-by-step-by-step laid out so clearly…the checklist and such…and the case studies…that’s worth the price alone in my opinion. I mean, from a “what’s my time worth” / business systemization standpoint.

    Just my $0.02.

    …jp

  • Is this basically a round robin auction course ?

    In the big picture, yes. But it’s tailored for the real estate investor and for today’s market. Frankly, having reviewed it, I think just having the step-by-step-by-step laid out so clearly…the checklist and such…and the case studies…that’s worth the price alone in my opinion. I mean, from a “what’s my time worth” / business systemization standpoint.

    Just my $0.02.

    …jp

  • Mark

    Hey,

    Just curious as to why these educational products “sell out”. I know that its not a logistics issue, as reproductions are fast and have high ROI. Im thinking its a marketing thing, which is fine but disallows me to buy products when I have the inclination. Ive rarely been in the position to take advantage of one, as I check in on this site on my own time and not “upon notification.” I dont have an email, that is checked regularly, which I would give to a website. This is purely for email preservation. Im sure JP even keeps a “newsletter free” email. Life is too hectic, and email too important to a business owner, to be clogged with newsletters. Just my thoughts. I’m interested to hear the other side of the coin…

    Hi, Mark. Great question, and here’s the honest truth: It’s almost always a salesmanship tactic to incite scarcity and fear of loss, to motivate (and increase) sales.

    Now, having said that, I’m sure there are times when other reasons exist for “selling out” or “closing up shop”. But they’re now the exception, not the rule.

    But also, I don’t really have a problem with it, and here’s why: As long as you’re not lying to do it, there’s nothing wrong with using (or even creating) scarcity or fear of loss in order to motivate someone to take action.

    If you lie to do it (and some people do, sadly) then it’s clearly just plain wrong and shouldn’t be tolerated. In fact, it should be exposed and shamed IMHO.

    But if you’re being authentic and honest about the way you do it, then “closing the doors” or setting a quantity in which you’re going to be “sold out” is really no different than putting a deadline on your purchase contract for the other party to consider and make a decision. You want to get their attention and woo them out of the “I’ll deal with it later” mindset if, in fact, they’re a viable prospect. And saying “this offer’s only good until…” is a viable way of doing this (as long as you don’t lie and keep your word).

    Consider the “limited time offer” or even the “fire sale” at the local store. It’s all basically the same thing.

    I find it interesting how many people seem to revile against limited a sale to incite urgency, but at the same time will gladly employ similar tactics without hesitation to buy/sell houses.

    I for one have no problem with salesmanship or the art of persuasion as long as it’s practiced with honesty and integrity.

    Anyway, off the soapbox now for me. 🙂 Does that make sense?

    …jp

  • Mark

    Hey,

    Just curious as to why these educational products “sell out”. I know that its not a logistics issue, as reproductions are fast and have high ROI. Im thinking its a marketing thing, which is fine but disallows me to buy products when I have the inclination. Ive rarely been in the position to take advantage of one, as I check in on this site on my own time and not “upon notification.” I dont have an email, that is checked regularly, which I would give to a website. This is purely for email preservation. Im sure JP even keeps a “newsletter free” email. Life is too hectic, and email too important to a business owner, to be clogged with newsletters. Just my thoughts. I’m interested to hear the other side of the coin…

    Hi, Mark. Great question, and here’s the honest truth: It’s almost always a salesmanship tactic to incite scarcity and fear of loss, to motivate (and increase) sales.

    Now, having said that, I’m sure there are times when other reasons exist for “selling out” or “closing up shop”. But they’re now the exception, not the rule.

    But also, I don’t really have a problem with it, and here’s why: As long as you’re not lying to do it, there’s nothing wrong with using (or even creating) scarcity or fear of loss in order to motivate someone to take action.

    If you lie to do it (and some people do, sadly) then it’s clearly just plain wrong and shouldn’t be tolerated. In fact, it should be exposed and shamed IMHO.

    But if you’re being authentic and honest about the way you do it, then “closing the doors” or setting a quantity in which you’re going to be “sold out” is really no different than putting a deadline on your purchase contract for the other party to consider and make a decision. You want to get their attention and woo them out of the “I’ll deal with it later” mindset if, in fact, they’re a viable prospect. And saying “this offer’s only good until…” is a viable way of doing this (as long as you don’t lie and keep your word).

    Consider the “limited time offer” or even the “fire sale” at the local store. It’s all basically the same thing.

    I find it interesting how many people seem to revile against limited a sale to incite urgency, but at the same time will gladly employ similar tactics without hesitation to buy/sell houses.

    I for one have no problem with salesmanship or the art of persuasion as long as it’s practiced with honesty and integrity.

    Anyway, off the soapbox now for me. 🙂 Does that make sense?

    …jp